Power lifting: Keys to a better lift program

The following elements were associated with a higher safe lift index – and lower workers' compensation claims:

• For residents not able to move around on their own, do procedures require powered mechanical lift use?

• For residents not able to move around on their own, do their care plans require the use of powered mechanical lifts?

• When a CNA's job performance is being evaluated, how often is the use of powered mechanical lifts mentioned?

• Are newly hired certified nursing assistants (CNAs) trained in how to use powered mechanical lifts?

• May two caregivers lift a resident manually?

• Director of Nursing's preference for powered mechanical lifts to move from bed to chair (or vice versa) for residents weighing 150 pounds.

• Director of Nursing's preference for powered mechanical lifts to move from bed to chair (or vice versa) for residents weighing 90 pounds.

• Director of Nursing's perception of barriers: difficult to use in the residents' bathrooms.

• Director of Nursing's perception of barriers related to resident concern about falling during a lift.

• Director of Nursing's perception of barriers: maintenance/battery/sling problems.

• Stringency of lift policy enforcement: if the policy is violated, is the employee fired, suspended but not fired, warned but not suspended or fired, or retrained only?

Source

Restrepo T, Schmid F, Shuford H, et al. Safe lifting programs at long-term care facilities and their impact on workers compensation costs. NCCI Research Brief, 2011. Available at http://bit.ly/m6AOCP