AMAP Accreditation Standards at a Glance

What it is:The American Medical Accreditation Program (AMAP) offers accreditation to individual physicians based on 12 core standards in the areas of education, licensure, ethics, and practice operations, and 11 out of 22 other supplemental standards.

Who runs it: AMAP is being developed by the Chicago-based American Medical Association (AMA). Its governing board includes three members of the AMA board of trustees, representatives of county, state, and specialty societies; a hospital representative; a managed care plan representative, representatives of the Joint Commission on Health Care Accreditation and the National Committee for Quality Assurance; representatives from a voluntary health organization, a consumer group, and an employer; and four at-large members.

What it costs: $50 to AMA members and $150 to nonmembers. Health plans and hospitals also will pay for the AMAP information, such as credential verification and continuing education. Those fees will cover the bulk of the AMAP cost.

Time frame: AMAP accreditation must be renewed every two years.

The standards include:

Graduation from an accredited medical school.

Current unrestricted medical license.

Current unrestricted registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) or no history of revocation of DEA registration within the past five years.

No disciplinary action against any medical license within the past five years.

No felony or fraud conviction since graduation from medical school.

Agreement in writing to abide by the AMA Principles of Medical Ethics and no reported ethics violations.

Completion of 100 hours of continuing medical education within two years.

Membership in an organization that conducts peer review of its members, such as a hospital medical staff or Medicare certification.

Completion of an AMAP-approved self-assessment program (effective July 1998).

AMAP office site review with a score of 70% or better, or practice in an accredited hospital, medical group, or clinic.

11 of 22 possible points from supplemental standards, such as conducting clinical continuous quality improvement projects (2 points), completing a residency training program (4 points), and having board certification (3 points).