Diabetes must be treated aggressively, ADA says

Ever since the American Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study demonstrated that lowering blood glucose in patients with both Types 1 and 2 diabetes slows or prevents development of diabetic complications, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in Alexandria, VA, has stressed vigorous treatment of diabetes.

The association’s latest clinical practice recommendations for diabetes management were published this year. A summary of "Standards of Medical Care for Patients With Diabetes Mellitus" can be found on the Internet at http://journal.diabetes.org/CareSup1Jan00.htm. The entire document is at www. diabetes.org/DiabetesCare/Supplement199/ S32.htm. In addition, the American Heart Association (AHA) in Dallas recently published a "Statement for Healthcare Professionals" on diabetes and cardiovascular disease as well as an additional statement from the AHA, the ADA, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.1,2

References

1. Grundy SM, Benjamin IJ, Burke GL, et al. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: A statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association. Circulation 1999; 100:1,134-1,146. Internet: circ.ahajournals. org/cgi/content/full/100/10/1134.

2. Diabetes mellitus: A major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A joint editorial statement by the American Diabetes Association; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International; the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; and the American Heart Association. Circulation 1999; 100:1,132-1,133.