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July 1, 2013

View Archives Issues

  • Non-adherent patients? Check your communication skills

    If your patients arent following their treatment plan and end up in the hospital or emergency department or fail to keep their chronic disease under control, resulting in complications, dont automatically blame the patient.
  • CMA Reader Survey Now Online

  • Slow down and keep it simple

    As a case manager, your job isnt done just because you told a patient something. Your job is done when the other person understands it, says Helen Osborne, MEd, OTR/L, president of Health Literacy Consulting, a Natick, MA-based firm.
  • Health plan focuses on healthcare literacy

    As part of its efforts to reduce admissions and emergency department visits, Capital District Physician Health Plan (CDPHP) has embedded case managers in 15 primary care practices and is conducting a pilot project that embeds a case manager in a local hospital.
  • Embedded CMs work with physicians, hospital

    As part of its efforts to reduce admissions and emergency department visits, Capital District Physician Health Plan (CDPHP) has embedded case managers in 15 primary care practices and is conducting a pilot project that embeds a case manager in a local hospital.
  • Physician follow-up makes patients happy

    It is entirely understandable for emergency providers to question any new task or responsibility handed down by regulators or administrators. Busy providers are already stressed with burgeoning patient volumes and all the pressures associated with handling acute care crises.
  • Text message tool cuts time for stroke patients

    Sometimes just making people aware of their performance is all that is necessary to significantly improve care. Investigators at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) found this to be precisely the case when they attempted to use this approach to improve door-to-needle times for stroke patients who presented to the ED for care at UCSF Medical Center.