Having trouble on the information highway?

If the information superhighway still baffles you, you’re not alone. The resources in this article may help you master this new domain.

Books and reports

• Alderman E, Kennedy C. The Right to Privacy. New York: Knopf; 1995.

• Computer-based Patient Record Institute (CPRI). Guidelines for Establishing Informa- tion Security Policies at Organizations Using Computer-based Patient Record Systems. Schaumburg, IL: CPRI; 1995.

• Computer-based Patient Record Institute (CPRI). Guidelines for Information Security Education Programs at Organizations Using Computer-based Patient Record Systems. Schaumburg, IL: CPRI; 1995.

• Deloitte and Touche LLP. U.S. Hospitals and the Future of Health Care. Deloitte and Touche: Philadelphia; 1996.

• Donaldson M, Lohr K, eds. Health Data in the Information Age: Use, Disclosure and Privacy. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994.

• Harris L, Westin A. Health Information Privacy Survey 1993. Conducted for Equifax. New York: Louis Harris and Associates; 1993.

• Louis Harris and Associates. Equifax-Harris Mid-Decade Consumer Privacy Survey. New York: Louis Harris and Associates; 1995.

• Kennedy R. "The Value of CHINs." In Wakerly, R, ed. Community Health Information Networks. Chicago: American Hospital Association; 1994, pp. 37-52.

• Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. For the Record: Protecting Electronic Health Information. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1997.

• Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council. Observed Practices for Improving the Security and Confidentiality of Electronic Health Information: Interim Report. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1996.

• National Library of Medicine. Current Bibliographies in Medicine: Confidentiality of Electronic Health Data, No. 95-10. Rockville, MD: National Library of Medicine; 1996.

• Office of Technology Assessment. Protecting Privacy in Computerized Medical Information. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 1993.

• Rothfeder J. Privacy for Sale: How Computerization Has Made Everyone’s Life an Open Secret. New York: Simon and Schuster; 1992.

Articles

• Aldrich N. Information systems profes- sionals cite trends in health care computing. Special Report. Healthcare Informatics 1995; 12:16a-24a.

• Dardeen K. ERNIE: Emory’s Record Number Integrity Effort. J of AHIMA 1994; 65:26, 28, 30.

• Schick IC. Personal privacy and confidentiality in an electronic environment. Bioethics Forum 1996; Spring:25-30.

• Munro N. Infotech reshapes health care marketplace. Washington Technology 1996; Aug. 8:1.

Associations

The following organizations offer seminars, conferences, educational materials, newsletters, journals, and reports on health care information technology issues.

• American Health Information Management Association, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60611-1683. Telephone: (312) 787-2672. Web site: http://www.ahima.org.

• College of Healthcare Information Management Executives, 3300 Washentaw Ave., Suite 225, Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4250. Telephone: (313) 665-0000. Fax: (313) 665-4922. Web site: http:// www.chime.net.org.

• Computer-based Patient Record Institute, 1000 E. Woodfield Road, Suite 102, Schaumburg, Il 60173. Telephone: (847) 706-6746. Fax: (847) 706-6747. Web site: http:// www.cpri.org.

• Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, 230 E. Ohio St., Suite 600, Chicago, IL 60611-3201. Telephone: (312) 664-4467. Fax: (312) 664-6143.