CE/CME questions

17. A work-up of a headache patient in the ED should always include:

A. complete problem-focused history.

B. neurological examination.

C. lumbar puncture.

D. Both a and b


18. Which of the following statements is false?

A. Most cerebral aneurysms that cause subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) arise from arteries located in the circle of Willis.

B. Approximately 35% of cerebral aneurysms arise from the anterior circulation.

C. When ruling out SAH, a negative CT scan should be followed by a lumbar puncture.

D. A lumbar puncture is more sensitive than a CT scan for the detection of SAH.


19. Which of the following statements is true regarding SAH?

A. SAH is more common in women.

B. A family history of SAH in a first-degree relative is a risk factor for SAH.

C. A prior SAH is a risk factor for a subsequent SAH.

D. All of the above


20. Appropriate questions to ask a patient presenting to the ED with headache include:

A. When and where did the pain start and how has it progressed?

B. Have you had similar, or worse, headaches in the past?

C. Have you had a fever?

D. All of the above


CE/CME objectives

[For information on subscribing to the CE/CME program, contact customer service at (800) 688-2421 or e-mail customerservice@ahcpub.com.]

The participants will be able to:

• identify important elements in the work-up of a headache patient presenting in the ED;

• recognize the initial location of many cerebral aneurysms and identify effective means of detecting cerebral aneurysms;

• identify risk factors associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage;

• recognize important questions to ask a patient who presents to the ED with a headache.